wordpainting:

So true!
razorshapes:

Richard Ross - Museology
razorshapes:

Richard Ross - Museology
razorshapes:

Richard Ross - Museology
razorshapes:

Richard Ross - Museology
razorshapes:

Richard Ross - Museology

tedbunny:

Samar Hassan

Chris Hondros was an American Pulitzer Prize-nominated war photographer. In 2005, he traveled to Iraq in order to cover the war. On January 18, 2005, Hondros was in Tal Afar when he witnessed a car that failed to stop at a U.S. checkpoint. U.S. Soldiers feared a suicide bomber and opened fire on the car killing both parents and injuring one of their five children. Hondros approached the scene and captured a picture of 5-year-old Samar Hassan splattered in her parent’s blood. After the photo was published, it quickly caused controversy and was spread across the world. Many feel the picture is the most iconic image of the Iraq War, similar to the naked Vietnamese girl screaming and running after a napalm attack. The Iraq War delivered few singular images, partly because it was too dangerous for photographers. The U.S. military also set strict rules for journalists.

In 2011, Samar Hassan looked at the picture for first time and was interviewed by the New York Times Middle East. About the incident she said that her family was in the car because her brother was sick and that they were returning from the hospital. In 2011, Samar was living on the outskirts of Mosul in a two-story house with four other families, mostly relatives. Chris Hondros was quoted about the once in a lifetime photograph: “Almost every soldier in Iraq has been involved in some sort of incident like that or another, I would say. Their attitude about it was grim, but it wasn’t the end of their world.” It was reported on April 20, 2011, that Chris Hondros and photojournalist Tim Hetherington were killed by a mortar attack in Misrata while covering the 2011 Libyan civil war. (x)

“So yesterday—was it yesterday?—yes, I’m sure it was, unless it was before that, another day, another month, another year—I don’t know. But it must be yesterday, since the day has not begun, the sun has not reappeared. How long has the night lasted?
— Guy de Maupassant, Paris Tales (via wordsnquotes)

(via wordsnquotes)

realfart:

this should be an oil painting

(via leuhh)

“If you care about something enough, it’s going to make you cry. But you have to use it. Use your tears. Use your pain. Use your fear. Get mad…get mad.”
— Sherman Alexie, The Absolutely True Diary of a Part-Time Indian (via wordsnquotes)

(via wordsnquotes)

“I have so much to say to you that I am afraid I shall tell you nothing.”
— Fyodor Dostoevsky (via requiemforthepast)

(via leuhh)

“Emotions, in my experience, aren’t covered by single words. I don’t believe in sadness, joy, or regret. Maybe the best proof that the language is patriarchal is that it oversimplifies feeling. I’d like to have at my disposal complicated hybrid emotions, Germanic train-car constructions like, say, the happiness that attends disaster. Or: the disappointment of sleeping with one’s fantasy. I’d like to show how intimations of mortality brought on by aging family members connects with the hatred of mirrors that begins in middle age. I’d like to have a word for the sadness inspired by failing restaurants as well as for the excitement of getting a room with a minibar. I’ve never had the right words to describe my life, and now that I’ve entered my story, I need them more than ever.”
— Jeffrey Eugenides, Middlesex (via wordsnquotes)

(via wordsnquotes)

“Man is the only creature who refuses to be what he is.”
Albert Camus, The Rebel.  (via wordsnquotes)

(via wordsnquotes)